An Interview with Alfred J. Garrotto

 

Blogger’s Note:  Please join Al Garrotto at the December 12, 2015 Mt. Diablo California Writer’s Club Holiday meeting.  Al will be speaking on the Perfection aspect of the Three Ps of Publishing.  We have a seated meal for this event and you can choose from: pasta primavera, salmon, chicken parmesan, or NY steak.  Costs are $20 members and $25 nonmembers. Reservations required, contact Robin Gigoux at ragig@aol.com , leave a message at 925-933-9670, or sign up via PayPal: Click “buy now” on the Mt. Diablo website, http://cwcmtdiablowriters.wordpress.com/next-program/ . Add the $2 transaction fee.  In all cases, please let Robin know your meal choice so the restaurant can plan. Sign-in starts at 11:15 am. Luncheon 12 – 12:45 pm. Speakers 1- 2 pm at Zio Fraedo’s Restaurant: 611 Gregory Lane, Pleasant Hill. $25 members, $30 guests Reservation deadline: noon, Wednesday, December 9th.  If you need to cancel, you must do so before noon on Friday, Dec 11 to avoid forfeiting the cost of the meeting.

  1. In one paragraph, summarize your book: There’s More . . . : a Novella of Life and Afterlife

Relief pitcher Jack Thorne stares at his catcher’s target. His single focus is to get this batter out. If he does, a coveted World Series ring will be his. But, will this pitch be his last? The Universe might have a different plan for this Catholic priest-turned-ballplayer. There’s More is a creative imagining of the ultimate human mysteries—death and Afterlife. This story invites readers to expand their existing concepts and consider broader cosmic possibilities in answer to the universal question, “What’s next?”

  1. What was the inspiration behind writing this book?

There are two sources of inspiration for There’s More . . . 
First, I am a passionate baseball fan and student of the game. I’ve always wanted to write a baseball story. This particular tale was inspired by a friend I knew well, who gave up a career in baseball to become a Catholic priest. His name was John Thom. At the age of 32, he was murdered “in the line of duty.” My main character, Jack Thorne, is a lot like my priest-friend.

My second source of inspiration came from the catalyst character in Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables, Bishop Charles Francois Myriel. For a long time, I’ve wanted to write a novel based on him. Jack Thorne and Bishop Myriel first met, when I began writing There’s More. They immediately liked each other, and the story took off from there.

  1. Who are your favorite authors? 

I’ll try to keep my list as short as possible by focusing on fiction writers. Number one is Victor Hugo, primarily as author of Les Miserables, the most amazing novel I’ve ever read and the one that has had the greatest influence my life. I also admire Ann Patchett, and I’ve often said that Bel Canto is a novel I wish I had written myself. (She beat me to it.) I like Ken Follett for being able to write in epic style, which I cannot. My stories are small and tight. I greatly admired his novel, Pillars of the Earth. I have read the first two volumes of his 20th Century Trilogy and found them to be great models of telling an epic story from the point of view of an international cast of ordinary people with real lives and passions. Other favorite novelists include Jussi Adler-Olson and Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

  1. What has been the biggest challenge on your path to publication? 

Although my earlier novels were published by commercial houses, they were always off the mark from what the current market was looking for. My biggest obstacle to commercial success may have been my inability to write for the “hot market.” I’ve chosen, instead, to write the stories that were in my heart and send them out into the universe.

  1. Was this book easier to write than your previous novel, The Saint of Florenville: A Love Story?

Yes, but only in the sense that I already had a lot of the material that ended up in There’s More. Let me explain. I was writing a baseball novel that just wasn’t going anywhere. At the same time, I was gathering material for a novel about Bishop Myriel of Les Miserables fame. And that wasn’t going anywhere. Reluctant to give up on these two projects, I got the idea to put the two stories together and . . . voila! It worked. The odd couple of Jack Thorne and Bishop Myriel melded quite well, and I’m very happy with the result. I think they are too.

  1. What advice would you give to new writers?

Let me speak to first-time novelists. (Nonfiction is a different animal, usually rising out of an area of the author’s unique experience and expertise.) Often, writers must make a choice—write what’s in your heart, chase what is currently hot, or try to “divine” what might be the next “hot thing,” by the time you finish writing your book. Make whatever choice you wish, then give it everything you’ve got. Set your imagination free and sit your bottom in a chair. Work as long as it takes to get the book written, edited, proofed, and published. Most of all enjoy the process of story building. Have fun watching your characters blossom and grow.

  1. If you were to describe yourself as a character in There’s More . . . , who would that be?

I’d be Bishop Myriel. In a way, I’m a lot like Victor Hugo in that respect. His personal life was far different from the lives of his two heroic figures, Jean Valjean and Bishop Myriel. I’ve always thought that Hugo saw in these two characters the best self he truly wanted to be—spiritual, compassionate, forgiving, faithful. Like me, the real Hugo could not bring himself to maintain these desired qualities in his personal life.

  1. What are your writing strengths?

The first is perseverance, the ability to see a project through, from concept to publication. As a novelist, I create characters who act and talk like real people. The best compliment I ever received was from a reader of one of my early novels. She was present at a book signing at a local Barnes & Noble store. She commented that my writing “read like poetry.” I don’t know if that’s true or not, but I do think my writing has a comfortable flow to it.

  1. What do you see as the challenges in adapting a novel to a screenplay?

So far, I’ve adapted one of my novels, The Saint of Florenville, to a screenplay. It has garnered a lot of interest, but so far no option. I will soon begin adaptation of There’s More for the big screen. The challenge is to think visually. In a novel, you can rummage around inside a character’s head—for a long time. Film is visual storytelling and demands that the adapter be able to create memorable images on the page that will later translate to the screen. Learning the technical aspects of screenwriting are not all that difficult, but it helps to have someone “in the business” to offer advice. My advisor is my friend, the Italian director Max Leonida, whose career as a filmmaker in the U.S. is heating up.

    10. How do you balance writing with a full-time job?

Although I’ve passed retirement age, I still work full time. There are weeks when I do not touch my manuscript. Even so, characters and plot are always present and active somewhere in my imagination. Then, at other times I feel so compelled to write that I find cracks in my schedule where I can do that.

I hope you’ve enjoyed learning about Alfred J. Garrotto.

To learn more, visit his website http://www.alfredjgarrotto.com.

He blogs at wisdomoflesmiserables.blogspot.com (e-mail him at algarrotto@comcast.net).

There’s More . . . is his seventh novel and eleventh book. They are available on Amazon.com at (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=alfred%20j.%20garrotto) and other online booksellers.

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One Response to An Interview with Alfred J. Garrotto

  1. Susan Berman says:

    Al, you are such a productive writer and, knowing that, makes me want to sit down and “get after it.” Many thanks for agreeing to be interviewed.

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